Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation

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When diagnosing high CPU or disk usage, the Task Manager in Windows is a user’s best friend. Giving real-time statistics on what processes are using which resources, you can identify a “rogue” process easier. Once you know what’s doing the damage, you can better remedy the issue and save your computer from being fried by its own processes.

WHAT IS WINDOWS AUDIO DEVICE GRAPH ISOLATION?

The process Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation is the base of the Windows audio engine. It controls the Windows sound enhancement process.

Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation is separated from the standard Windows Audio service. Separation of the services allows developers of sound drivers insert their own audio effects without touching Windows Audio service itself.

However, some people face a problem with these sound enhancements due to higher use of system resources, which consumes your CPU too much.

IS IT OK TO DISABLE WINDOWS AUDIO DEVICE GRAPH ISOLATION?

To be honest, that’s a bad idea. Technically, you can do this, but the point is, Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation is an important process that makes your system audible, so disabling it will cause your Windows to go mute. Which is not a desirable outcome, right?

As such, if Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation keeps eating into your CPU, we recommend you to go to the root of the problem and resolve it, using the methods provided below.

IS IT POSSIBLY A VIRUS?

“Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation” itself is an official Windows component and very likely not a virus. While we haven’t seen reports of any viruses hijacking this process, it is always possible we’ll see one in the future.

To check it,

• Right-click on the ‘Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation’ from the Task Manager and select the ‘Open File Location’ option.

• The file will be located in ‘C:\Windows\System32’ by default named as Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation. In some cases, this process would show as AudioDG.exe.

• If the file is stored in the default location, then ensure it’s not a virus.

Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation

IF IT’S NOT A VIRUS, THEN WHY IS IT CONSUMING YOUR HARD DRIVE CPU?

Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation can stop working properly. It might be due poorly written audio enhancement drivers. The whole process then might cause high memory usage. There might be no sound and it can crashes and alerts you about it.

HOW TO FIX WINDOWS AUDIO DEVICE GRAPH ISOLATION PROCESS TO CONSUME HIGH CPU?

METHOD 1: DISABLE ALL SOUND EFFECTS

Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation was created to handle additional sound enhancements on your PC. Therefore, if we disable the PC’s ability to play sound enhancements, this might solve the problem. This is especially useful if you have zero desire to use sound enhancements on your PC. Note that this isn’t the same as disabling the computer’s sound! It’s just disabling the ability to add fancy effects to it (such as an echo).

Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation

• Right-click on the speaker icon in the Windows taskbar located in the bottom of your desktop screen and select Playback devices.

Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation

• A window will open. Under the Playback tab, click on Speakers and go to Properties.

Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation

• In the next window, click on the Enhancements tab and check the box beside ‘Disable all sound effects’.

Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation

• Click Ok.

• In case you don’t find this option in the box, go back to the Sound dialog box and select the rest sound options like Microphone.

• After that, disable the sound effects.

METHOD 2: REINSTALL THE AUDIO DRIVER

If this doesn’t do the job, the problem may not be with the sound effects. Instead, it might be with the audio driver that handles these effects.

To solve this, first, download the current version of your audio drivers. You can do this from your PC manufacturer’s site, or you can find the model of your motherboard and search for audio drivers associated with it.

Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation

1. Right, Click on Windows Start Button, then select Device Manager.

Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation

2. In the Device Manager window, expand the “Sound, video and game controllers” category.

Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation

3. Right-click on your sound card device name and a context menu will pop up.

Windows Audio Device Graph Isolation

4. Confirm the uninstallation by checking the box beside ‘Delete the driver software for this device’.

You’re almost done now restart your PC then open Device manager again and then click Scan for hardware changes then update your Realtek High Definition Audio you’re done.

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